The Grade Music Exam Syllabus: easy guide by E-MusicMaestro for parents and first-time candidates

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The grade music exam syllabus is written principally for teachers who are preparing candidates for music exams. The terms therefore tend to be specialised and are not always clear to non-musician parents and first-time candidates. This guide is an attempt to explain, in non-technical terms in as far as possible, what is examined and how it is marked.

 

So first, some definitions …

Piecea piece of music or a song, of difficulty appropriate to the grade

Scales – technical exercises consisting of groups of notes, pitched step by step

Arpeggios – technical exercises made up of just the most ‘important’ notes of the scale

Sight reading – playing music not seen before, after a short time to prepare

Improvisation – making music up – a few notes are given and the candidate has to make up the next notes to produce a complete phrase of music

Technical exercise – a piece specially designed to require technical skills appropriate to a particular instrument or voice

Musical Knowledge questions – questions related to the pieces played, such as naming a note in the score or giving the meaning of a musical term

Aural tests – listening tests that show musical memory and perception

Examples:

  • notice changes in loud or quiet, fast or slow in a tune played by the examiner
  • sing back a short tune just played by the examiner
  • spot the difference when a tune is played with an altered note

Intonation – whether or not the notes are played or sung in tune (this obviously cannot apply to the piano or organ)

Musical detail – aspects such as loud and quiet playing, pace changes and playing the notes smoothly or not, using the pedal for pianists, as required by the style and character of the music.

Style – relates to the era when the music was composed and to the conventional way of interpreting music from that period in history.

Character – the mood of the music, created by a combination of many aspects, including the notes used in the tune and also the way the music is played.

 

 

Next, some information on the exam and the syllabus …

Examining boards

The major examining boards for graded music exams, operating worldwide but particularly in the UK, Hong Kong, Singapore and New Zealand are Trinity College London and ABRSM.

How long does a music exam take?Who takes music exams?

Grade music exams take between ten and thirty minutes, depending on the grade.

Who takes music exams? 

 There is no age limit – anyone is eligible to take a music exam.

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How is a music exam marked?

The examiner writes a report form during the actual exam. The report form summarises strengths and weaknesses in the way the music was performed. Examiners do not offer advice to the candidate about how to play or practise, nor do they advise teachers on the best way to teach. The report forms and certificates are then sent to the person who entered the candidate, usually the teacher.

What criteria are used?

The criteria for achieving a pass in a music exam are based on general musical elements and principles and therefore they are broadly similar for each examining board.

Because general criteria are used, examiners do not need to be experts in playing every instrument, but they do know how each instrument should sound when played well.

The criteria used by an examining board are freely available to the public, in the printed syllabus and on the website for each examining board.

Marks are awarded depending on to what extent the candidate’s performance matches up to the best standards of achievement possible in that exam.

Trinity exams have a maximum mark of 100: Pass 60, Merit 75, Distinction 87.

ABRSM exams carry a maximum mark of 150: Pass 100, Merit 120, Distinction 130.

Pieces carry more marks, relatively, than other skills in music exams. Each piece is marked separately, rather than a global mark being given for the overall standard of the three pieces.

Do all music exam boards examine the same things?

The major music exam boards ask for three pieces or songs but there are some differences between Trinity and ABRSM in the supporting tests.

 

Trinity grade music exams compared with ABRSM music exams

Trinity skills examined

Trinity Initial Grade – Grade 5

Three pieces / songs

Scales and arpeggios plus three technical exercises

Any two of these – Sight reading

Aural tests

Improvisation

Musical knowledge questions

Trinity Grades 6 – 8

Three pieces / songs

Scales and arpeggios plus three technical exercises

Sight reading

One of these – Improvisation

Aural tests

Trinity marking criteria

  • Notational Accuracy & Fluency (7 marks): getting the notes and rhythms right and playing without hesitations or stumbles
  • Technical Facility (7 marks): ability to create a good sound and to control the instrument or voice – aspects such as playing with varied articulation (eg legato and staccato) and pedalling for piano
  • Communication & Interpretation (8 marks): playing or singing in a manner that is and engaging for the listener and suitable for the style and character of the music

ABRSM Grades 1 – 8

ABRSM skills examined:

Three pieces / songs

Scales and arpeggios in selected keys for each grade (singers instead perform a traditional, unaccompanied song)

Sight reading

Aural tests

ABRSM marking criteria:

  • Pitch: correct notes for all instruments and voice, with correct intonation – ie playing or singing in tune
  • Time: correct rhythms, suitable speed / pace changes and fluent playing
  • Tone: consistently well controlled sound – clear and pleasant to listen to
  • Shape: musical detail eg gradual increase or decrease in loudness that goes with the musical phrases, or variations in loud and quiet
  • Performance: playing or singing in a manner that is and engaging for the listener and suitable for the style and character of the music

 

General advice for supporting tests

Scales and arpeggios should be:

  • accurate in notes and correctly pitched in intonation
  • fluent and rhythmical
  • musically played with a confident sound

Sight reading should be:

  • fluent and accurate
  • musically played, with appropriate detail
  • confident sounding

Aural tests should show:

  • accurate answers
  • perceptive listening
  • confident replies to questions

Improvisations should show:

  • appropriate development of the fragment of music given as a stimulus
  • fluency
  • confidence

 

How to do well in a music exam

The best advice is to prepare thoroughly in every aspect to be examined.

Pieces are, of course, the most enjoyable part of the exam preparation but those candidates who neglect to practise scales and arpeggios, who are not competent sight readers or who have not practised developing their aural skills or improvisation skills will lose marks.

 

Help with preparing for a grade music exam

Develop music aural skills with E-MusicMaestro Aural Test Training:

http://e-musicmaestro.com/auraltests

 

Video demonstration and advice – ABRSM grade exam piano pieces:

https://www.youtube.com/user/9pegasus9

 

Video demonstration – piano syllabus pieces, Trinity and ABRSM 2015-16,as from August 2014 

https://www.youtube.com/user/EMusicMaestroChannel

Practise ABRSM piano scales, grades 1 – 5 with Scalebox:

http://www.scalebox.co.uk

Pre-exam online video assessment – a new service from E-MusicMaestro, offering expert, specific advice as well as an assessment of your playing. All instruments and voice.

For details and booking: 

mail@e-musicmaestro.com

Please use email title, Performance Assessment.

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4 Comments

Filed under Music performance

4 responses to “The Grade Music Exam Syllabus: easy guide by E-MusicMaestro for parents and first-time candidates

  1. Pingback: The Grade Music Exam Syllabus: easy guide by E-MusicMaestro for parents and first-time candidates | sandymusicmaestro

  2. This is too nice. God bless you !
    Have a great week.

  3. Nigel Martin

    Please remember that LCM is also a major examining board so please don’t be biased!

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